Why Workplace Democracy Matters

“Surely one of the great ironies of the modern world is that democracy, imperfect as it is in the political realm, seldom extends to the workplace.” – George Cheney

Where would you rather work – a stiff, fear-laden workplace that may look great on a résumé but makes you miserable, or one where you’re valued and your voice is heard? Workplace democracy is the principle that employees should have a voice in determining their working conditions and wages. That ‘voice’ can take many forms — informal employee committees, company-wide surveys, Coworker.org campaigns, collective bargaining, worker-ownership. And like any democracy, people can disagree about the best way to address a problem.

As our economy shifts, the definition of an “employee” is changing, too. Whether you’re a freelance journalist, a professional athlete or an adjunct faculty member, it’s important that everyone have the power to improve their jobs. At Coworker.org, anyone can petition an employer, client or supply-chain employer for changes they’d like to see.

The history of working people taking steps to improve their lives and their working conditions extends back centuries, long before collective bargaining was codified into law in America and elsewhere. At Coworker.org, we’re interested in building technology for the labor movement of the future — one that’s nimble, responsive, and inclusive of all working people. If you have ideas about how we can build better tools for you, email us at info@coworker.org. We’d love to hear from you!